How introvert and extrovert traits are expressed in the workplace

You’ve probably already come across the the terms ‘introvert’ and ‘extrovert’, and the associated stereotypes that can arise – the former as unsocial, secretive and aloof, the latter aggressive, egotistical and socially needy. But we also know instinctively and anecdotally that these are unhelpful and often negative generalisations – after all, if you want the introverts and extroverts in your workplace to work productively together, you will need them to appreciate the very meaningful contributions that the other can bring.

by Lesley Aitcheson, ago

More thoughts on Unconscious Bias

Could you be discriminating against certain staff in your workplace without even realising it? It’s not something that many of us would like to think still happens in today’s supposedly more equal world. But even the most well-meaning of us can still fuel discrimination through certain unconscious workplace biases; we explore this in our business breakfast session Unconscious Bias.

by Lesley Aitcheson, ago

Love your job!

What we need to think about is attitude and expectations – it is all about how to approach your job to maximise your job satisfaction. Being happy and productive in your job is really important as it has a knock on effect on your outlook on life in general.

by Lesley Aitcheson, ago

When people resist change

Change can affect individuals in a variety of ways: During change, people can move through several stages – fear, denial, acceptance and finally growth as identified in Elizabeth Kübler-Ross’s grief cycle. We looked at this model last week and it’s often the one that is used to illustrate some of the common effects that personal change can have on an individual’s morale over time.

by Lesley Aitcheson, ago